Tag Archives: novel in a day

3 Ghosts (NIAD 2016)

Edward Myer was dead: to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. The register of Myer’s burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. His wife signed it: and his wife’s name was good upon ’Change, for anything she chose to put her hand to. Old Myer was as dead as a door-nail…

This book was written as a Novella-in-a-Day on June 17th, 2017. Four versions were produced (one called ‘Blue’, one called ‘Red’, one called ‘Green’ and one called ‘Yellow’) each written in just 24 hours by 12 authors.

(with apologies and thanks to Charles Dickens)

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Novella-in-a-Day? NiaD VI is going ahead in JUNE!

Some of you will recall that we never got round to scheduling a NiaD for last October because of an unwelcomed excess of Real Life™. When I announced that it wouldn’t be going ahead you lot were amazing, with exactly the right blend of disappointment and well-wishes to make me all warm and fuzzy, and help that Real Life™ seem manageable.

So, to say “Thank You”, we’re going to run a very special out-of-season version of Novel-in-a-Day… Welcome to Novella-in-a-Day!

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00NiaD will return in…

Well, October is nearly over and you may have noticed that there hasn’t been a call for participants in a Novel in a Day this year, and there isn’t a nice shiny new ebook for you to download and enjoy for free.

Real life kind of got in the way this year, making it not possible to pull something together of the standard you’ve come to expect. So, I’m taking the opportunity to reset the timing to what will hopefully be a less hectic bit of the year for all of us. NiaD should be back some time in January. Follow here or on one of social media sites listed in the menus above and I’ll let you know when dates are confirmed!

How to plot

I have been sharing a series of pictures on Instagram over the past couple of weeks that outline the process I go through to plot out a story for the Novel-in-a-Day events each year. If you’re a ‘pantser’ who likes to just wing that thing, then the rest of this post will probably give you a bit of a chuckle. It might also give you an interesting framework to retrospectively apply after you’ve done that first draft to test how strong / focused your tale is. For the rest of us, it’s a helpful way to develop a story from scratch. Continue reading

Marshal Law (NiaD 2015)

September 1867. Marshal Ben Wright is forced to take extreme measures to take back control of Flintwood, AZ, a mining town overrun by rowdy frontiersmen and outlaws in the long shadow of the Civil War.

This book was written as a Novel-in-a-Day on October 17th, 2015. Three versions were produced (one called ‘Blue’, one called ‘Red, and one called ‘Yellow’’) each written in just 24 hours by 22 authors.

 

 

 

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Faster than an infinite monkey

I’m a little bit pleased with myself.

I was sitting at my desk earlier today — trying my best to focus on the work at hand — when the postman arrived with a package.

You might not be aware if you only know me through pigfender.com, but if you’ve been active on the Novel in a Day section of the Scrivener forum then you will probably know that last September I was badgered into promising to rustle up a t-shirt to commemorate our annual writing event. Several people volunteered design concepts, which I dutifully ignored in favour of a slightly obscure reference to the introduction from the original NiaD (back in 2011).

After months spent tinkering with the design, and plenty longer procrastinating over how to get them made, the postman finally arrived today with the very first Novel in a Day t-shirt.

I like it.

I’m wearing it right now.

In fact… I’d be half naked without it.

If you’re interested, you can get one here. It is an excellent way to solve your own partial nudity problems, and has a nice picture of a chimp on it.

PS, you can also buy a mug.

Any resemblance to reality is purely coincidental

At the start of each of the Novel-in-a-Day books there is a disclaimer, not dissimilar to the one you see boilerplate to the credits at the end of (nearly) every movie you see: “All characters and events in this publication are fictitious and any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

I’ve been having a minor disagreement (all done very politely and respectfully, I might add!) with someone on the internet for a little while now about the value of first hand research in writing. The other person was advocating piggybacking on research done by other writers and, this being the internet, sensible points were made by several people on both side of the viewpoint. But a recent revival of the discussion got me thinking about that disclaimer. And when it comes down to it, I’m a little ashamed to have used it. After all, can there be any worse insult to someone’s writing to say that their characters and events bear no resemblance at all to reality? Or if it does, it must be a coincidence? Continue reading