Tag Archives: Writing

Start Wearing Purple (NIAD 2017)

Biographer Jacob Heath has an unhealthy level of enthusiasm for his work.

When he decides to write the story of San Francisco’s  masked vigilante, the Terrordon, and his arch-enemy the Sleepwalker, Jacob’s ‘method writer’ approach might get him in deeper than he can handle.

This book was written as a Novel-in-a-Day on October 28, 2017. Three versions were produced (one called ‘Blue’, one called ‘Red’, and one called ‘Orange’) each written in just 24 hours by 20 authors.

 

 

 

 

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Novel in a Day 7 is going ahead!

Just a short post to let you all know that the sign-up sheet for this year’s Novel in a Day is now live! The event will take place on Saturday October 28th 2017 (UK time, as usual) and — unlike our brief bonus novella in June earlier this year — will be the full fat version.

Speaking of June’s Novella in a Day, I really enjoyed our alternative version. Being a shorter and more contained plot, it was a *lot* less effort, pain and pressure in the run up to the day (although the actual day itself was just as, if not more, hectic than usual). Thanks to everyone who took part in that, it was a really fun read!

But back to the present… Novel in a Day, October 28th, sign up here. I’ve started working on the plot for it now and I’m really excited! :)

Novella-in-a-Day? NiaD VI is going ahead in JUNE!

Some of you will recall that we never got round to scheduling a NiaD for last October because of an unwelcomed excess of Real Life™. When I announced that it wouldn’t be going ahead you lot were amazing, with exactly the right blend of disappointment and well-wishes to make me all warm and fuzzy, and help that Real Life™ seem manageable.

So, to say “Thank You”, we’re going to run a very special out-of-season version of Novel-in-a-Day… Welcome to Novella-in-a-Day!

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How to plot

I have been sharing a series of pictures on Instagram over the past couple of weeks that outline the process I go through to plot out a story for the Novel-in-a-Day events each year. If you’re a ‘pantser’ who likes to just wing that thing, then the rest of this post will probably give you a bit of a chuckle. It might also give you an interesting framework to retrospectively apply after you’ve done that first draft to test how strong / focused your tale is. For the rest of us, it’s a helpful way to develop a story from scratch. Continue reading

Lessons on writing from the Fresh Prince of Bel Air

For those that don’t know, Save the Cat is a book (and a computer application, an iOS and Android app, a set of workshops, and two other books) by screenwriter Blake Snyder. It’s aimed very firmly at other screenwriters looking for a bit of script-doctor type feedback on structuring their stories. Whilst it’s been criticised by some[citation needed] for its formulaic approach, and I wouldn’t advocate using it religiously to structure your work, I do recommend it (and the sequel, Save the Cat Strikes Back) both for a fun read and for providing a great vocabulary to use when talking about story structure… even if you’re only using it to talk to the nagging voices inside your own head.

What’s this got to do with Will Smith? Well aside from the fact that he literally saves some cats in his movies (the above shot is from 1998’s Enemy of the State, and the Internet[citation needed] pointed out that he saved the Scientist’s cat “from the demo-bot” in I, Robot), the theme tune to his 1990s sit-com, The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, declares itself to be a story (“Now this is a story all about how, My life got flipped, turned upside down…”). So, I wondered whether the rousing ballad that Will wrote with Jazzy Jeff followed the “optimum” structure set out in Save the Cat.

In short, would Blake Snyder have thought the theme tune from the Fresh Prince was a “good” story…? Continue reading

The mouse exclusion

About this time last year I wrote a post making fabulous (and ridiculously amusing) predictions about the state of publishing for the next fifty years. One of those predictions was a dramatic increase in the quality and variety of books available for free as a result of expired copyright.

Copyright law is one of those topics that I find it hard to stay away from when I hear it discussed. It’s often misunderstood, incorrectly interpreted, and / or taken for granted, but one part of the debate more likely to prompt me to get my trolling hat on than any other is expiry. Every now and again I’ll hear of creators and consumers complaining about the duration that copyright subsists after the death of the author, typically citing a certain American purveyor of theme parks and animated features as aggressively lobbying to get further extensions to protect their commercial interests (ie, their exclusive rights to use the Mouse and his friends). Those people are wrong.

And not “in my opinion they are wrong,” or “I can see where they’re coming from, but I personally don’t agree”. They’re just wrong. Continue reading

The devil and the dictionary

In the play by Christopher Marlowe, Faust sells his soul to the devil [Spoiler, sorry]. But like any sensible commercial operative, Faust does have the sense to do a little bit of due diligence before completing the transaction.

The exchange, if memory and Google serve me correctly, goes something like:

FAUST: So, Mephy-baby. I thought you were supposed to be in hell? They, like, let you out and stuff?
MEPHISTOPHELES THE DEVIL: Why this is hell, nor am I out of it. Think’st thou that I who saw the face of God and tasted the eternal joys of Heaven, am not tormented with ten thousand hells in being depriv’d of everlasting bliss?
FAUST: Huh?
MEPHISTOPHELES THE DEVIL: O Faustus! Leave these frivolous demands, which strike a terror to my fainting soul.
FAUST: Man up, dude.

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